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Come to 'An Introduction to Self-Publishing' Event!

You've just put your cap back on your pen or saved the last sentence. You're latest work is now complete. Now what? Join Jessika, manager of The Troy Book Makers, to find out more about polishing your completed work, getting ready for print, and what steps you can take to sell your book. This is an informational session that gives authors the basics about self-publishing. The Troy Book Makers staff provides tips, to-do lists, and honest advice.

MARCH 17TH AT 6:30PM

Please take a moment to sign up on their website.

And remember, after you've published your book, we'd be happy to carry it! Check out our consignment program for local authors here.

The Sugar Season Event

Douglas Whynott, author of Giant Bluefin and A Unit of Water, A Unit of Time: Joel white's Last Boat, has a new book coming out- on maple syrup! And, as a solid New England business,  how could we not be excited to hear what he's got to say? Stop in on sunday, March 9th at 4pm to learn more about the book, The Sugar Season, Whynott, and the maple industry. See you there!!

"Whynott has delivered the most complete and compelling account to date of the modern maple industry. His cast of vividly drawn characters and his descriptions of the challenges they overcome will make you feel like you're right there beside them in the North Country's sugarbushes. It's one sweet read."--Barry Estabrook, author of "Tomatoland"

 "The cycle of the maple season is one of the great signifiers of the mountain year in the northeast. It is lovingly delineated here, with a foreshadowing of the shifts ahead in a changing world. May it move us to action!"--Bill McKibben, author of "Oil and Honey"

"Once again, Douglas Whynott demonstrates his uncanny ability to open up what seems to be ordinary and reveal it as something much more than we ever could have imagined. In this case, it's the maple syrup industry, and Whynott take us from the metal bucket hanging on a tree into a world of currency bets, Global Strategic Reserves, climate change, and international trade. It's quite a story, and quite a book."--Daniel Okrent, author of "Last Call: The Rise and Fall of Prohibition"

Thank you!!

 

 

 

The week before Valentine's Day we here at The Bookloft asked customers if they'd like to be a 4-year old's secret Valentine. And we got an amazing response! With your help, we were able to collect over 50 books for 2 local head start classes for 3 and 4 year olds. That's enough for every single child to take home their very own book for the keeping, and to have some to enjoy and share in the classroom, for many more children to come.

 

Ormond Gigli's Girls

 

Ormond Gigli once explained to us here at the Bookloft how his famous signature photograph came about. The stunning shot is of a brownstone that stood empty across from his own home on East 58th street in 1960s New York. The old building was scheduled for demolition the next day to make way for modern developments. So Gigli, with his keen freelance photographer's eye, had the idea "to get beautiful women". Well, can't go wrong with that, right? After calling a modelling agency, dozens of beautiful women did indeed materialize, wearing different brightly colored dresses. Of the piece, TIME says, "Widely considered one of the most famous fashion shots of the 1960s, it captures a slice of long-gone New York ...and the picture's influence stretches beyond photography."

Fifty-four years later, Gigli's beautiful body of work is now bound in a brand new book whose cover bears the striking "Girls in the Windows" photo. The work in the book harks back "to a time when a photographer could persuade a steam shovel operator to lift a model skyward" (New York Times) in a prosperous and transformative postwar era. Many images have not been seen for decades, and include subjects such as Barbara Streisand, Louis Armstrong, John F. Kennedy, and many more. Gigli himself provides much of the commentary, explaining his personal experiences that led to the conception of the pieces.

Want to check out the volume in person? Stop by and oo and ah over it with us! Plus, Gigli was kind enough to stop in himself and leave us with several signed copies!

3D Printing Gone Bookish

Who needs a 3D printed tape dispenser? It's not like we haven't already got tape dispensers. We've got LOADS of tape dispensers. Plus, tape dispensers are boring. But you know what isn't boring? A 3D printed book cover! And the first one ever in the history of... well, ever, is coming out in January.

Chang-rae Lee's newest book, a dystopian novel set in a severely socially and culturally stratified America, is being published in two formats come the new year: one the usual hardcover with a paper dust jacket, the other a hardcover in a 3D plastic case. Only 200 of these signed and limited edition books will be produced- and at $150 a pop. But just look how beautiful they are! Lee himself has said, “What I like about this is that it revisits the book as an object rather than only content. Content is what’s most important ultimately of course, but this is a book with a certain movement to it that regular books don’t have.” It can truly be seen as a thoughtful piece of art- the title itself "On Such a Full Sea" seems to be accurately represented in this sculpturally wavy cover. And, much as the novel challenges readers' perspectives on the world in which they live, one's view of the book itself shifts with one's physical perspective. Says Lee: "It’s all about changing the familiar. That’s ultimately what all art is about. That’s what we all do as writers."

Happy Holidays from The Bookloft!

 

Thanks for a wonderful holiday season! We had a great time these past few busy days helping you all find just the right gift for your loved ones! And now that Christmas is over, we're offering our leftover holiday stock- like Christmas cards and wrapping paper- at 50% off... so you can get ready for next year!! 

Or just stop in to treat yourself (or a loved one) to a great new read to end the year of 2013! And thanks for everything, folks- we wouldn't be here without you!

Alice Munro Awarded Nobel Prize in Literature

Here at The Bookloft, we are in a celebratory mood due to Alice Munro's well-deserved win of the Nobel Prize in Literature!


Alice Munro is a Canadian fiction writer known in particular for her masterful contemorary short stories. Her work has been highly acclaimed for decades, beginning with Dance of the Happy Shades in 1968 which won Canada's highest literary prize, the Governor General's Award.


Munro went on to win the Governor General's Award two more times and in 2009 was awarded the Man Booker International Prize.


But enough about formal awards- the list could (and does) go on and on! Alice's work is not just the kind that wins literary prizes (oh so many). She appeals to all sorts of readers- in fact, we've staff picked her books more than once!

Dear Life Stories, Munro's newest work, was staff picked by Ellyne, who aptly describes Munro's stories as "miniature novels"- so her work isn't just for the short story fans out there. Ellyne continues, "Her prose is simple, lean, and beautiful. Her lives are full of poignant longing; you may recognize yourself in a particular stroke of this writer's pen."


Eric's staff pick, Runaway, is also a Munro masterpiece. Just as Ellyne noted that we may see pieces of ourselves within her stories, Eric believes that "the women in these stories could be our spouses, our sisters, daughters or neighbors". At the end of the day, Alice Munro "gets what it is to be human"


Want to sample some of Munro's work and see if it's for you? We've always got several of her books here at The Bookloft- and some at half off!

Banned Books Week

It's Banned Books Week!

This means the booksellers at the Bookloft have been puzzling their way through long lists of books that have been challenged and banned throughout the United States. Some of our very favorites appear on the list, like our old Staff Picks, The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini and Ender's Game by Orson Scott Card.

Sometimes, especially as lovers of all books, it can be hard to tell why a book was challenged to be banned. Often times, the very reason for banning the book is the exact thing the author is trying to warn us against, not encourage.

Take for example The Giver by Lois Lowry, winner of the prestigious Newbery Medal. Some of the most common objections of the book were over infanticide and “sexual awakening”. This classic novel portrays a dystopian society in which one must take pills against sexual feelings so that no natural reproduction takes place becuase every human is assigned a job within the community- one available position is Birthmother. Babies that are born with any problems perceived to be problematic to the society are killed. As is typical of dystopian novels, Lois Lowry presents readers with a society that is obviously getting things wrong. And, in the hopeful end, the main character is able to escape this oppressive society- and save a baby to boot!

At other times, the reason given for banning a given book can seem simply wrong. Ender's Game, for example, was characterized as pornographic- though no sexual scenes whatsoever are written.

Though reasons for banning books may vary, many agree on which books to ban. Some most commonly challenged authors include J.K. Rowling, Judy Blume, John Steinbeck, Stephen King, Suzanne Collins, Aldous Huxley, Maya Angelou, Mark Twain, J.D. Salinger, Harper Lee, Garth Nix, and Lois Lowry.

If so many esteemed, classic, popular, and beloved writers and their works are the bulk of the books being banned- what does that say about us as a society? How can we believe that something can be simutaneously great and dangerous? Do we believe that what makes something great is that it contains controversial material? Do we simply love what's bad for us (like twinkies)? Or, is our world really split into two groups: those who love these books, and those who want them banned? If so, who are these people- these "book-banners"?

According to the American Library Association (ALA), the people who most often challenge books are parents. So, not surprisingly, the institutions that challenge books most are schools and school libraries. Most children's books do come with age appropriateness recommendations, but parents' understandable and commendable wish to protect their children sometimes turn into a desire to try to ban books that offend them from all children and adults. The ALA (from whence come the above images and information) believes that "this method of protection contains hazards far greater than exposure to the 'evil' against which it is leveled... Individuals may restrict what they themselves or their children read, but they must not call on governmental or public agencies to prevent others from reading or viewing that material." And, indeed, U.S. Supreme Court Justice William Brennan, in Texas v. Johnson, once said, "If there is a bedrock principle underlying the First Amendment, it is that the Government may not prohibit the expression of an idea simply because society finds the idea itself offensive or disagreeable."

Want to give some of these banned books a whirl yourself and see what YOU think? Check out the ALA's Top 100 Banned Books List and pick one out for yourself as you think about these questions: Do you agree that this book should be banned? Do you believe that banning books at all is a good idea?

The Bone Season

Samantha Shannon's novel has been turning so many heads that we here at The Bookloft have decided to see what all the hubbub is about!

The Bone Season takes place in 2059. Nineteen-year-old Paige Mahoney is working in the criminal underworld of Scion London, based at Seven Dials, employed by a man named Jaxon Hall. Her job: to scout for information by breaking into people’s minds. For Paige is a dreamwalker, a clairvoyant and, in the world of Scion, she commits treason simply by breathing.

It is raining the day her life changes for ever. Attacked, drugged and kidnapped, Paige is transported to Oxford – a city kept secret for two hundred years, controlled by a powerful, otherworldly race. Paige is assigned to Warden, a Rephaite with mysterious motives. He is her master. Her trainer. Her natural enemy. But if Paige wants to regain her freedom she must allow herself to be nurtured in this prison where she is meant to die.

In her debut novel Shannon, 21 years old and a recent Oxford grad, introduces a clever and mysterious premise with an original and interesting magic system. Though classified as both dystopian and fantasy, it manages to feel both realistic and fantastical- a gripping mix!

Critics have posited that the planned 7-book series is the next Hunger Games, or even the next Harry Potter. To this, Shannon says, “The J.K. Rowling thing has been a blessing and a curse. It got me some attention, which has been great because more people have found out about the book, but at the same time, I saw people on Twitter reacting: ‘Who does this girl think she is?’ The truth is, I don’t want to be the next somebody. I want to be the next me.”

Interested to see what The Bone Season is really like- and if it's for you? Come check out our stack of beautiful copies!

The Art of the Autobiographical Novel Event!

Hey Guys! Feeling like you should get out of the house more, but unwilling to get your nose out of your books? (We understand!)

The Bookloft is excited to invite you to an after-hours night of fun here among the book stacks! On Saturday, August 17th at 7pm, Alison Larkin and Marshall Messer will be speaking about their respective autobiographical works, The English American and Change at Jamaica! And because book-reading can only be improved by food-eating, we'll all chat about memoir-style writing while munching on delicious refreshments!

                          

Alison Larkin's book garnered much enthusiasm, with The London Times calling it "Hugely entertaining". And we love keeping this fantastically funny local author in stock here, both in print and in audio!

Marshall Messer has been a cab driver, bartender, garbageman, actor, and teacher, and he has played blues harp at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Of Marshall Messer's debut novel, Jaimy Gordon, author of Lord of Misrule, says: "A more replete novel of sporting New York in all its vulgar glory could hardly be imagined."

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